People
Fact-checked

At PublicPeople, we're committed to delivering accurate, trustworthy information. Our expert-authored content is rigorously fact-checked and sourced from credible authorities. Discover how we uphold the highest standards in providing you with reliable knowledge.

Learn more...

Who is Euripides?

Euripides was a master of Greek tragedy, whose profound plays have captivated audiences for millennia. His works explore the depths of human emotion, often challenging societal norms. With timeless themes of love, power, and fate, Euripides' dramas remain as relevant today as they were in ancient Athens. How do his stories echo in our modern lives? Let's explore together.
Mary McMahon
Mary McMahon
Mary McMahon
Mary McMahon

Euripides was a Greek tragedian and poet who unfortunately did not receive many accolades during his lifetime, although he is now revered as one of the greatest Classical Greek authors. During his life, he wrote almost 100 plays, 18 of which survive into the modern age, and many of these plays continue to be performed in theaters all over the world. The work of Euripides is readily available in many libraries and bookstores in a variety of translations, for people who do not read Ancient Greek.

Not much is known about Euripides. He was born around 480 BCE, and he died in 406 BCE. During his lifetime, he had two wives, Melito and Choirile, and most accounts agree that he had at least three sons, and possibly a daughter as well. His work and contemporary evidence suggest that Euripides was born into a wealthy and influential family, and he certainly chafed against Greek religious beliefs, questioning the role of the Gods and the purpose of life on Earth.

It is believed that most of Euripides' works premiered in the ancient Greek city state of Athens.
It is believed that most of Euripides' works premiered in the ancient Greek city state of Athens.

The work of Euripides is deeply critical of Greek society, human emotions, and traditional Greek religious beliefs. This revolutionary and sometimes offensive content probably explains why Euripides was not revered during his lifetime. In fact, Euripides was often the butt of jokes, with comic playwrights like Aristophanes including him as a recurring figure in their plays.

Modern translations of Euripides' work are available at most bookstores.
Modern translations of Euripides' work are available at most bookstores.

The plays of Euripides were quite distinctive, taking a radical departure from traditional Greek drama. Many of his plays featured strong female characters, along with intelligent slaves, which was rather unusual. The content of his work was also often deeply philosophical and introspective, dealing with human emotions in a way which other playwrights had not done. The work of Euripides also includes biting commentary on social issues and Athenian society, and it sounds like he was rather disenchanted with the society he lived in.

Many of the plays of Euripides dealt with the rise and fall of the Persian royal family, which governed, in part, from the city of Persepolis.
Many of the plays of Euripides dealt with the rise and fall of the Persian royal family, which governed, in part, from the city of Persepolis.

Some of the more well-known works of Euripides include Medea, Electra, The Bacchae, The Trojan Women, Orestes, Heracles, and Hippolytus. This master of Attic tragedy must have impressed someone, because his work has endured where the work of others did not. The fact that people continue to read, perform, and discuss the works of Euripides illustrates the compelling nature of his work, as many people continue to find it accessible and engaging thousands of years after it was written.

Frequently Asked Questions

Who was Euripides and why is he significant in history?

Euripides was an ancient Greek playwright, born around 480 BCE, who is considered one of the great tragedians of classical Athens, alongside Aeschylus and Sophocles. His work is significant for its innovative approach to dramatic structure, psychological depth, and exploration of social and philosophical themes. Euripides' plays often focused on the inner lives and motivations of characters, a departure from the more traditional focus on gods and heroes. His surviving works, including "Medea," "The Bacchae," and "Hippolytus," continue to be studied and performed, underscoring his lasting impact on literature and theater.

How many plays did Euripides write and how many survive today?

Euripides is believed to have written around 92 plays, but only 18 have survived in complete form, with fragments of others also extant. This corpus of work is a testament to his prolific nature and the esteem in which he was held in antiquity, as well as the enduring relevance of his themes and characters. The survival of these plays is largely due to their continued popularity and academic interest, which led to their preservation and copying by scholars throughout the centuries.

What are some of Euripides' most famous works?

Among Euripides' most famous works are "Medea," which tells the story of a woman's revenge against her unfaithful husband; "The Bacchae," a complex exploration of divine influence and human ecstasy; "Hippolytus," which examines themes of chastity and desire; and "Electra," focusing on the aftermath of the Trojan War and familial vengeance. These plays are renowned for their emotional intensity, intricate characters, and bold narrative choices, which have influenced countless generations of writers and dramatists.

What themes did Euripides commonly explore in his plays?

Euripides commonly explored themes such as the human condition, the role of the gods in human affairs, the nature of justice and revenge, and the struggles of women and outsiders in society. His work often challenged societal norms and questioned traditional values, making him a controversial figure in his own time. Euripides' ability to delve into the psychology of his characters and present morally ambiguous situations has made his plays enduringly relevant and thought-provoking.

How did Euripides influence modern literature and theater?

Euripides' influence on modern literature and theater is profound. His focus on character psychology and social commentary paved the way for the development of drama as a medium for exploring complex human emotions and societal issues. Modern playwrights and authors have drawn inspiration from his nuanced characterizations and willingness to tackle difficult subjects. Euripides' plays are still widely performed today, and his storytelling techniques have become foundational elements in the narrative arts, influencing genres beyond tragedy, including comedy and the novel.

Mary McMahon
Mary McMahon

Ever since she began contributing to the site several years ago, Mary has embraced the exciting challenge of being a PublicPeople researcher and writer. Mary has a liberal arts degree from Goddard College and spends her free time reading, cooking, and exploring the great outdoors.

Learn more...
Mary McMahon
Mary McMahon

Ever since she began contributing to the site several years ago, Mary has embraced the exciting challenge of being a PublicPeople researcher and writer. Mary has a liberal arts degree from Goddard College and spends her free time reading, cooking, and exploring the great outdoors.

Learn more...

You might also Like

Discuss this Article

Post your comments
Login:
Forgot password?
Register:
    • It is believed that most of Euripides' works premiered in the ancient Greek city state of Athens.
      By: Dimitris Karkanis
      It is believed that most of Euripides' works premiered in the ancient Greek city state of Athens.
    • Modern translations of Euripides' work are available at most bookstores.
      By: ele
      Modern translations of Euripides' work are available at most bookstores.
    • Many of the plays of Euripides dealt with the rise and fall of the Persian royal family, which governed, in part, from the city of Persepolis.
      By: Valery Shanin
      Many of the plays of Euripides dealt with the rise and fall of the Persian royal family, which governed, in part, from the city of Persepolis.