We are independent & ad-supported. We may earn a commission for purchases made through our links.

Advertiser Disclosure

Our website is an independent, advertising-supported platform. We provide our content free of charge to our readers, and to keep it that way, we rely on revenue generated through advertisements and affiliate partnerships. This means that when you click on certain links on our site and make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn more.

How We Make Money

We sustain our operations through affiliate commissions and advertising. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, we may receive a commission from the merchant at no additional cost to you. We also display advertisements on our website, which help generate revenue to support our work and keep our content free for readers. Our editorial team operates independently from our advertising and affiliate partnerships to ensure that our content remains unbiased and focused on providing you with the best information and recommendations based on thorough research and honest evaluations. To remain transparent, we’ve provided a list of our current affiliate partners here.

Who is Marcus Garvey?

Tricia Christensen
By
Updated May 23, 2024
Our promise to you
PublicPeople is dedicated to creating trustworthy, high-quality content that always prioritizes transparency, integrity, and inclusivity above all else. Our ensure that our content creation and review process includes rigorous fact-checking, evidence-based, and continual updates to ensure accuracy and reliability.

Our Promise to you

Founded in 2002, our company has been a trusted resource for readers seeking informative and engaging content. Our dedication to quality remains unwavering—and will never change. We follow a strict editorial policy, ensuring that our content is authored by highly qualified professionals and edited by subject matter experts. This guarantees that everything we publish is objective, accurate, and trustworthy.

Over the years, we've refined our approach to cover a wide range of topics, providing readers with reliable and practical advice to enhance their knowledge and skills. That's why millions of readers turn to us each year. Join us in celebrating the joy of learning, guided by standards you can trust.

Editorial Standards

At PublicPeople, we are committed to creating content that you can trust. Our editorial process is designed to ensure that every piece of content we publish is accurate, reliable, and informative.

Our team of experienced writers and editors follows a strict set of guidelines to ensure the highest quality content. We conduct thorough research, fact-check all information, and rely on credible sources to back up our claims. Our content is reviewed by subject matter experts to ensure accuracy and clarity.

We believe in transparency and maintain editorial independence from our advertisers. Our team does not receive direct compensation from advertisers, allowing us to create unbiased content that prioritizes your interests.

Marcus Garvey (1887-1940) is a Jamaican National Hero, whose work included founding the United Negro Improvement Association (UNIA), and creating a movement of inspiring blacks in the US and elsewhere to return to their ancestral home of Africa. For some, his suggestions and black separatist attitudes were controversial and for others, his movement and ideas were considered heroic.

Garvey was born in Jamaica, and in early life cultivated an interest in books. He learned early that society tended to discriminate against blacks, and in his teen years, he began to work hard for fair wages for printers, when he became a printer’s apprentice. Though Marcus Garvey was born in Jamaica, he traveled extensively in South America and England. In 1914, he returned to Jamaica, where he began to garner the support of many Jamaican blacks, and he was able to form UNIA.

With UNIA successfully gaining power, Marcus Garvey moved to Harlem in the USA in 1916, and brought a powerful message to many residents there. He argued that blacks had every right to be proud of their race, and that they did not benefit from living in a racist society. This argument prompted Garvey to negotiate with the government of Liberia in order to grant returning black citizens from elsewhere a way to return to Africa. Liberia, however, would not agree to Garvey’s proposals, and the back to Africa movement lost much of its steam because there was not single place for returning African descendants to settle.

Though the back to Africa movement did not see fruition, Marcus Garvey was a powerful voice, and in a way much before his time in demanding equal civil rights for black citizens of countries around the world. He was a strong advocate of black self-help, the idea that blacks needed to not rely on a world that discriminated against them but to aid each other by establishing organizations separate from a governing white society. This can also be viewed as Black Nationalism, and is sometimes thought of as a conservative viewpoint, or alternately a very radical one. Garvey’s work influenced the opinions of leaders like Malcolm X later.

Some black leaders of the time, among them W.E.B. Du Bois, felt that Marcus Garvey created greater problems in attempting to obtain civil rights for blacks. Du Bois took a much different approach, favoring uniting black and white society, and he especially criticized Garvey’s alignment with organizations like the Ku Klux Klan, who essentially wanted to rid America of blacks with a similar “back to Africa movement.”

There was a call for the arrest of Garvey by black citizens of the US, and he was convicted of mail fraud, though most consider the charges to have been manufactured. His sentence was commuted after two years, and he was deported back to Jamaica. He then took up residence in England, in 1935, and lived there until his death in 1940.

To some, Marcus Garvey is an inspiration and a hero. He is almost invested with sainthood by the Rastafarian movement, where some believe he is the reincarnation of John the Baptist. Others find his positions too radical. He is nevertheless an important figure in history, whose voice cried out for African descendants to be considered at their full worth, rather than discriminated against, as was often the case in Garvey’s era.

PublicPeople is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
Tricia Christensen
By Tricia Christensen , Writer
With a Literature degree from Sonoma State University and years of experience as a PublicPeople contributor, Tricia Christensen is based in Northern California and brings a wealth of knowledge and passion to her writing. Her wide-ranging interests include reading, writing, medicine, art, film, history, politics, ethics, and religion, all of which she incorporates into her informative articles. Tricia is currently working on her first novel.

Discussion Comments

By anon929845 — On Feb 03, 2014

I think it is high time to revive Mr. Garvey's ideas! I think the first one on the boat should be Obama!

By anon138891 — On Jan 03, 2011

Some black leaders of the time, among them W.E.B. Du Bois, felt that Marcus Garvey created greater problems in attempting to obtain civil rights for blacks.

More accurately: Some black leaders of the time, among them W.E.B. Du Bois, felt that Marcus Garvey's racial separatism created greater problems in attempting to obtain civil rights for blacks.

By anon138648 — On Jan 02, 2011

W.E.B. Du Bois opposed Garvey because Garvey was a racial separatist who supported racial segregation. Garvey was not only opposed by Du Bois, but virtually all civil rights leaders in the United States for his alliances with white racist organizations.

Tricia Christensen

Tricia Christensen

Writer

With a Literature degree from Sonoma State University and years of experience as a PublicPeople contributor, Tricia...
Learn more
PublicPeople, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.

PublicPeople, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.